10 takeaways from Duterte’s digital campaign

I’ve followed the campaign from the start and can see similarities between the Obama campaign (2008) and PNoy’s campaign (2010), here are some key take-aways:

1. The most successful digital strategies for the campaign were things that helped create a movement around the mayor – it created an advocacy around Mayor Rodrigo R. Duterte.

These activities included but were not limited to: Building a sizable base on Facebook including proliferation of Facebook pages and groups talking about the candidate. Building an email database. Sending of high-quality and engaging emails and other materials. Making the supporters an important part of the story. It allowed supporters to create compelling stories of the candidate in various forms like video, images and text. Facebook (along with email and mobile) were heavily used to ask supporters to join in on offline activities.

2. The Duterte campaign built a team from various volunteer groups who probably numbered in the thousands at the end of the campaign. Many of the most talented people in their individual professions became part of this team. For example, Nic Gabunada, former ABS-CBN top sales and marketing honcho, marshalled the digital warriors throughout the campaign period. Notable bloggers and social media specialists volunteered and worked side by side with their traditional media peers.

3. More so than any other campaign in our history, the Duterte campaign was a data-driven operation. A simple and concise digital strategy was developed to be at the heart of the campaign. Virality of content became one of the key goals. The team tried its best to measure every aspect of the digital campaign including messengers, messages, design, video, voice, segmentation and other tactics. Resources were directed to higher-performing activities. This is especially true for content that was going viral – the team helped by boosting it on Facebook.

4. The campaign’s recognition of the value of maximizing social media led to a critical decision of making the team an important part of the overall campaign – having the same priority as the field operations and finance and other units. The campaign was open to crowdsourcing content from the start noting that it came with risks of not being able to check all the materials.

5. The campaign used a simple measure of success: the value of higher engagement on Facebook over the lifetime of the campaign. The campaign boosted content that were resonating with the supporters and voters. Building the relationship with supporters over time produced better results – done by engaging with the different volunteer groups locally and from abroad.

DIGITAL. Thousands of online/digital content are created by volunteers and supporters of Rodrigo Duterte during the campaign. (Image from Rappler)

6. What made Duterte’s campaign materials special? The volunteers and supporters were given the creative leeway to design it based on their own interpretation of the campaign narrative and it then allowed the messaging to be strategically aligned with what voters cared for at the moment. This even spread offline where supporters created their own tshirt designs and used their own money to print them as well.

7. There was strong coordination between the digital and field teams. Facebook allowed faster communications between different supporters and groups supporting Mayor Duterte.

8. Thousands of online/digital content were created by volunteers and supporters themselves – this included hundreds of songs composed and created by various musicians for the candidate. The vision for the use of video was different from past campaigns. The team was not selling a candidate, they were simply covering the movement around the campaign. The team was able to engage people, draw in viewers and make them feel like they were part of something big. This was called by one online social media firm as citizen-led campaigning and that’s what happened.

9. The team curated content that was coming out from the volunteers and supporters and segregated it based on the target market: Facebook videos and image memes for Class D, E; high-quality and informative videos and platform-based content for Class A, B, C – overall, the team allowed supporters to co-manage the campaign.

10. It has to be mentioned that the way the candidate conducted himself allowed his supporters to create content about him and about his campaign. In the end, the candidate allowed the people to see him as the authentic candidate compared to his rivals who were perceived to be following a script.

Donate for #Haiyan Rebuilding Effort #ReliefPH

Here’s one way you can help in the rebuilding efforts in the communities that Super Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda) has devastated:

www.unitedway.org/philippines

Message posted via Facebook of Rapa Lopa, Exec. Director of the Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP):

To our friends in the United States of America and other countries who have expressed their desire to help out the victims of Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), you can now send funding support through the United Way Worldwide donation platform. The Philippine Business for Social Progress is the United Way affiliate in the Philippines.

To my friends in the US, please share this link to your respective networks there.

Sincerely appreciate all your concern, support and prayers!

UNITED, We will rebuild Lives!
=======================================

United Way Worldwide Disaster Rebuilding Fund Activated to Support Communities Affected by Typhoon in the Philippines

Dear Colleagues,

Thank you to everyone across our network who has reached out with offers of support for our team in the Philippines. United Way Worldwide has been in contact with Rapa Lopa and his team at Philippine Business for Social Progress (United Way in the Philippines). We are pleased to report that they are safe and working hard to identify and address both the immediate and long-term needs in the affected areas.

To that end, we have reactivated the United Way Worldwide Disaster Rebuilding Fund. The fund will be allocated to our partners in the Philippines, and contributions will be tax deductible for donors in the United States. We encourage you to promote this fund in your communities.

www.unitedway.org/philippines

We have also heard from several corporate partners interested in providing financial support. If you are approached by a company interested in making a contribution greater than USD 2,500.00, they may do so by contacting United Way’s International Donor Advised Giving team at 703-836-7112 x128 or via email at IDAG@unitedway.org.

If you have any additional questions, please email Paul Metcalfe, Director, Investor Relations, South East Asia and Pacific , or Alex Rodriguez, Manager of International Communications.

Thank you,

Joe Haggerty
Chief Operating Officer
United Way Worldwide

Let’s run to bring HOPE #RunforHopeCDO #RunforVisayas

Run4Visayas

Run for Hope CDO 13 in partnership with Xavier University NSTP is gathering 1,000 more runners to be with us on November 17, 2013 to run for our fellow Filipinos affected by Typhoon Yolanda. The run was initially organized to raise funds for our Yellow Boat communities in Cagayan de Oro City.

Register now at La Cabana Spa and Chris Sports Centrio Mall. Keep posted for more booth schedules and important run details. Follow us here: https://www.facebook.com/RunForHopeCDO13

Top Links for Typhoon #Haiyan #YolandaPH Rescue and Relief Efforts

Why the Philippines needs your help.

Check out this link showing the difference between Hurricane Katrina and Super Typhoon Haiyan – HOW TYPHOON HAIYAN COMPARES TO HURRICANE KATRINA

Summary of the extent of the damage – Worst disaster to hit PH

An example of what happened on the ground – Daughter’s last words: ‘Ma, just let go… Save yourself’

Interactive map showing the path of Haiyan – Mapping the Destruction of Typhoon Haiyan

Map showing before and after pictures of Tacloban – Before and After Typhoon Haiyan

Here are the main links I’ve found that summarize rescue and relief efforts following the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda), I’ll update it as I find more:

1) I really found this note by Undersecretary Manuel Quezon helpful – #RescuePH #ReliefPH and #YoladaPH: What’s going on, what you can do

2) The list that Rappler compiled is also quite comprehensive – #ReliefPH: Victims of Typhoon Yolanda need your help

3) For people outside the Philippines, this list by HuffingtonPost shows how you can help – Following Philippines Typhoon Haiyan, Here’s How You Can Help

4) List by CNN – How to help Typhoon Haiyan survivors

5) Crisis tools for Typhoon Yolanda – Google Asia Pacific Blog: Crisis tools for Typhoon Yolanda

6) List by NBCNews – How to help: Organizations offering relief to Typhoon Haiyan survivors

7) Business promotions to help victims – Businesses For #YolandaPH Relief

7) United Way Worldwide Disaster Rebuilding Fund Activated to Support Communities Affected by Typhoon in the Philippines

Useful reminders when packing in-kind donations:

useful-reminders

Let’s all unite to help the affected communities. Thank you!

PS – List of countries who have donated – Number of nations sending aid for ‘Yolanda’ victims growing

World Water Day: The patience you need for safe drinking water in Pakistan

Re-posting my blog post on Acumen’s website and the reason why I’m currently in Pakistan.

WORLD WATER DAY: THE PATIENCE YOU NEED FOR SAFE DRINKING WATER IN PAKISTAN

MARCH 22, 2013 BY  IN FELLOWSON THE GROUND,SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

In the last 2 years since I helped start the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation and in the six months I’ve been a Global Fellow at Acumen, I learned a great deal about patience.

As a part of my fellowship with Acumen, I moved to Lahore, Pakistan to work with Pharmagen Healthcare Limited, the social enterprise behind Pharmagen Water, which aims to provide clean, safe and affordable drinking water to low-income communities through a system of water shops around densely populated areas.  This service is vital in Pakistan as millions of the urban and rural poor still rely on outdated water systems or poorly-maintained water facilities.

In Pakistan, 40-60% of diseases are caused by drinking unsafe water, and according to the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources, 100% of tested water sources in Lahore contained unacceptable levels of arsenic contamination and half had unsafe levels of bacteriological contamination.  The health implications of this are grave and are a major reason why Pharmagen is working to improve public health by providing safe drinking water at the lowest possible price: around $0.45 for a 20-liter container, which is enough for a family of six for two days.

Paying to ensure your family has clean water may seem like necessity, but adoption among the poor can be difficult and slow. They have been using free water from public taps for years and are often unaware of the health risks associated with these unsafe water sources. Part of the difficulty in driving adoption is demonstrating that an investment in preventive healthcare actually saves money in the long-run by reducing medical costs.  This is especially true for children—clean water is an investment for proper nutrition and healthy human development.

My main job at Pharmagen Water is to convince potential customers of this truth.  Designing marketing campaigns is a challenge, not only because I still can’t speak Urdu proficiently, but more importantly, social enterprises face a different set of problems than traditional business.

One of Pharmagen’s street kiosk demonstrations in Lahore.

In a way, we’re competing against the mindsets of both our employees and target market as the social enterprise model is new to them.  Some employees have a hard time understanding why we sell a high-quality product at such a low price. Our target market is not accustomed to paying for water at all.

To say the least, building a successful social business is hard work.

Here are 3 things I’ve found to be critical:

  1. Focus on Social Impact – Patient capital is exactly that – an investor that is patiently waiting for the organization to get the business model right because the focus is on maximizing social impact. The challenges inherent in a social enterprise are almost completely different from a for-profit and a nonprofit so it’s important that the “capital” is willing to wait for a longer period of time before the organization is able to scale. The risk of failure is also an integral part of the learning process and in getting it right.
  2. Adaptive Leadership – Leadership without purpose is meaningless. Social enterprises are born out of a need to address a social problem.  Most of the time, the social enterprise’s management has to chart their own path – find a spot in the field and patiently grow what was planted. Pharmagen Healthcare Limited is probably the only organization of its kind in the whole of Pakistan – it takes tremendous amount of courage, persistence and patience to build something like this.
  3. Collaboration – We’re moving away from a world view that values competition as the only source of healthy growth – for social enterprises, nothing is more important than building linkages and relationships with the communities where they operate. That means building trust, not only with customers, but also with employees that are taking a bet on a new approach.

Social enterprises and social entrepreneurs are a different breed—they see a social problem in dire need of a solution and they go in not fully knowing the pitfalls but are ready to face what comes.

You need to have the strength, resilience, humility and the patience to see things through.

And sometimes to truly understand your customer, you must have three cups of chai tea with them – and, though it takes patience, it’s worth the wait.

Pharmagen Healthcare Limited supplies safe, clean and affordable drinking water to low-income residents of Lahore, Pakistan through an existing chain of open water shops. With Acumen Fund’s investment, Pharmagen is opening 32 new water shops. They currently supply more than 100,000 liters of safe water to customers each day, impacting the lives of over one million people in Pakistan.